Magical must-do in Egypt

February 20, 2019 in EGYPT | Comments (0)

Tags:

When in Hurghada – this is it – ancient wonders in a daytrip!.

Luxor & Karnak

The magic of ancient symbols in gigantic ancient columns

The “day” trip to Luxor was a rewarding experience, though a very long and tiring day – 17 hours on the go with 4 hours per way on the road. We were up at 4 am to have the early breakfast which the hotel thoughtfully provides.

Fortunately, we did not know about the terror attack that had just occurred – or we might have given up the day and missed its treasures. I might also have been more  worried about the sudden emergence of a woman in burka from behind a curtain at the back of our bus who stumbled past us at a stop on the way.

The bus actually had amenities – like toilet – and an electronic display about the temperatures. The seats laid back beautifully and my family slept.

I fortunately awoke for the magic of dawn in the desert mountains. To see the light emerge on sand spilling down the mountain to the road edge. To see the extraordinary sky dotted with different cloud. Small army outposts were the only spots where green sprouted – albeit desolately – the desert itself seemed rich with texture, colour and harmony

Finally we lumbered into the Nile Valley …. Travelling parallel to the great river (though it was out of sight) we saw canals or tributaries, palm trees and green fields, as well as shambolic towns bristling with mosques and old fashioned life, far removed from the familiar clichés of our western world. Traffic was full of scruffy old vans and adorable donkey carts, and traditional dress was the norm.

Carrying important cargo and leading his all important horse against the hooting traffic in Luxor – no doubt preferring to see the dangers than have them come from behind

Karnak temple was, more than expected, magnificent. The stony face of our teen  (who felt bullied needing to face culture rather than the fun life of the resort) softened as she seemed to grasp this was something worth seeing.

Little humans under the vast presence of the past

The columns (which have featured in movie thrillers) are breathtaking, for their immensity, solidity and 3d feeling with a deep hue of magic, perhaps due to the engraved symbols (like the powerful ank) catching light and shadow and with it intrigue and a sense of the past lurking tantalizingly just out of sight.

Why do sphinxes always lose their noses?

The day included lunch buffet in a small café (nice despite the cappuccino being a cup of hot water and a roll of powder); a taxi ride to the Nile and a boat ride over to the other side – the western sunset side where the Egyptians buried their dead. Behind was the East Bank, a skyline where mosques bristled like the back of a sow – the world of the living. Ahead the West Bank and a rim of mountains that hid the world of the dead. Valley of the Kings.

Looking back at the East Bank bristling with mosques and minarets
Looking over to the West Bank – ancient world of the dead.

We walked into a couple of tombs with murals amazingly still so colourful. One proposed tomb was too deep for me as a claustrophobic soul – so I sat and stared at the mountains, the haunting mountains where they burrowed so deep by oil light.

Our next stop Hatshepsut temple was backed by those same strange and brittle mountains. Impressive. She was a rather wicked lady who loved power (they all seemed to drink it like mother’s milk) …. And put the next heir to the throne Thuthmosis on the front for 30 years where he luckily survived.  Her temple was the only one built by a woman we were told by our pleasant (Egyptian Swedish speaking) tour guide  – and to be allowed to build one she had to persuade herself and others she was really a man.

Hatshepsut temple

Wiki says:

Hatshepsut was the fifth pharaoh of the Eighteenth Dynasty of Egypt. She was the second historically-confirmed female pharaoh, the first being Sobekneferu. Hatshepsut came to the throne of Egypt in 1478 BC.

Ancient Egypt online: She initially ruled as regent for her step-son Thuthmosis III but promoted herself to the role of pharaoh instead of passing power to him when he came of age. After her death Thuthmosis III and Akhenaten both intentionally damaged the monument. The former directed his attacks at Hatshepsut herself, either replacing her image with his own or simply obliterating references to her, the later damaged her temple because of the frequent references to the god Amun.

.


Leave a Reply